A ride to heal, remember 1862 hanging of 38 Dakota in Mankato

Posted on 2014/01/05

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<republication title=”A ride to heal, remember 1862 hanging of 38 Dakota in Mankato” url=”http://idlenomorewisconsin.tumblr.com/post/71335924084/a-ride-to-heal-remember-1862-hanging-of-38-dakota” date=”Dec 27, 2013 3:20 pm“>
A rider received sage smoke from Corbie of Crow Creek, South Dakota, after arriving at Reconciliation Park for the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday in Mankato.

A rider received sage smoke from Corbie of Crow Creek, South Dakota, after arriving at Reconciliation Park for the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday in Mankato.

Riders arrived in Mankato for the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday in Mankato.

Riders arrived in Mankato for the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday in Mankato.

Beth Holcomb of Kasota received sage smoke during the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday.

Beth Holcomb of Kasota received sage smoke during the Dakota Wokiksuye Memorial Ride Thursday.

They ride to remember.Traveling by horseback 330 miles from Crow Creek, S.D., to Mankato, through harsh December weather, Dakota tribal members completed this year’s Dakota Wokiksuye memorial ride on Thursday morning.As in years past, they shared sacred sage smoke, prayers and dances to commemorate the 151st anniversary of the largest mass execution in the nation’s history. On the day after Christmas 1862, on orders signed by President Lincoln, 38 Dakota fighters were hanged in Mankato following the bloody, six-week U.S.-Dakota War.The spot where the gallows once stood is now known as Reconciliation Park.To learn more about that tragedy and see a photo gallery of the riders, visit www.startribune.com/dakota.

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<quote at=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862“>The Dakota War of 1862, also known as the Sioux Uprising, (and the Dakota Uprising, the Sioux Outbreak of 1862, the Dakota Conflict, the U.S.–Dakota War of 1862 or Little Crow’s War) was an armed conflict between the United States and several bands of the eastern Sioux (also known as eastern Dakota). It began on August 17, 1862, along the Minnesota River in southwest Minnesota. It ended with a mass execution of 38 Dakota men on December 26, 1862, in Mankato, Minnesota.Throughout the late 1850s, treaty violations by the United States and late or unfair annuity payments by Indian agents caused increasing hunger and hardship among the Dakota. Traders with the Dakota previously had demanded that the government give the annuity payments directly to them (introducing the possibility of unfair dealing between the agents and the traders to the exclusion of the Dakota). In mid-1862, the Dakota demanded the annuities directly from their agent, Thomas J. Galbraith. The traders refused to provide any more supplies on credit under those conditions, and negotiations reached an impasse.[3]On August 17, 1862, one young Dakota with a hunting party of three others killed five settlers while on a hunting expedition. That night a council of Dakota decided to attack settlements throughout the Minnesota River valley to try to drive whites out of the area. There has never been an official report on the number of settlers killed, although in Abraham Lincoln’s second annual address, he noted that not less than 800 men, women, and children had died.

Over the next several months, continued battles pitting the Dakota against settlers and later, the United States Army, ended with the surrender of most of the Dakota bands.[4] By late December 1862, soldiers had taken captive more than a thousand Dakota, who were interned in jails in Minnesota. After trials and sentencing, 38 Dakota were hanged on December 26, 1862, in the largest one-day execution in American history. In April 1863, the rest of the Dakota were expelled from Minnesota to Nebraska and South Dakota. The United States Congress abolished their reservations.

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<refs>

<a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota“>Dakota – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</a>

<a href=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862“>Dakota War of 1862 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</a>

<external_links at=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862#External_links“>

</external_links>

<categories at=”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Dakota_War_of_1862

Dakota War of 1862

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<wikipediaInfobox what=”military conflict”>

Dakota War of 1862
Part of Sioux Wars, American Civil War
The Siege of New Ulm Minn.jpg
The Siege of New Ulm, Minnesota on August 19, 1862
Date 1862
Location Minnesota, Dakota Territory
Result United States victory
Belligerents
United States United States Sioux
Commanders and leaders
United States John Pope
Minnesota Henry Hastings Sibley
Little Crow
Wabasha
Big Eagle
Shakopee
Casualties and losses
77 soldiers
450–800 civilians[1]
150 dead, 38 executed[2]
</wikipediaInfobox>

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Posted in: Dakota, in memory